New Mexican Posole: Part II

In preparing for my move, I worked on paring down what I needed and what I did not.   I went through my closet to determine what clothes I was wearing and what clothes I was not.  I looked around my bathroom, and decided what items had outlived their utility.  And naturally, I went around my kitchen, searching for redundancies, coordinating with Caitlin to ensure that we did not arrive with two or three of every useful kitchen device.

Beyond these steps, I also worked to use up my food.  There was no need to stack my car with bags of flour and sugar.  By the same token, there was no sense in throwing away perfectly good butter or eggs.  The last few weeks saw a veritable flood of baking and cooking.

Among these items, a two-pound bag of dried posole was calling out to be cooked.  Buried deep in the pantry, behind the cans of beans and whole tomatoes, the large plastic bag rested on top of a plastic shoebox that held some of my reserve spices, those spices whose infrequent use pushed them off the countertop spice rack.

Unlike my first try at posole, which was delicious, this recipe looked and tasted more like those dishes that Caitlin and I encountered during our trip to Santa Fe.

new mexican Posole

Recipe adapted from an online source.

DOWN TIME: Overnight soaking required
PREP TIME: 30 minutes
COOK TIME: 3 hours 30 minutes
YIELD: Serves 8

WHAT TO GRAB:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 pounds beef round, cut into large pieces
1 large onion, medium chop
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 to 3 tablespoons New Mexican chili powder (I used chile molido)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon oregano
1 tablespoon Italian parsley, chopped
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 14-ounce can chopped tomatoes
1 14-ounce can whole tomatoes
6 to 8 cups of broth or stock (depending on desired thickness)
1 cup water
2 pounds of dried posole corn
Salt and pepper to taste
Mace (for garnish)
Sour cream (for garnish)

HOW YOU DO IT:

1.  Soak the posole overnight.

2.  In a large stock-pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat.  Add the chopped beef and cook until browned.  Add the onions, and sauté until golden.  Add the garlic, and cook for another minute.

3.  Reduce the heat to medium low, and add the chili powders, oregano, and cumin, and sauté for about 4 minutes.  Add the parsley and tomato paste, and cook for 4 minutes to allow everything to come together.  Add the chopped and whole tomatoes, then the stock and water plus the stock.  Finally, add the posole.

4.  Bring to a boil and reduce flame to low.  Softly simmer for 3 to 4 hours, or until the meat is falling apart tender and all is thick and rich.  You can add water, as necessary, depending on the desired consistency.  Add salt, pepper, and any spices to taste.

5.  Serve warm with fried tortilla strips, sliced avocado, and/or lime wedges.  You can also garnish with goat cheese or sour cream, and a touch of mace on top.

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6 responses to “New Mexican Posole: Part II

  1. I was invited to dinner at a friend’s house (Mexican) and the family had prepared posole with all the trimmings. What a revelation! Loved it and vowed to make it some day, still waiting for that day to come but your recipe seems less daunting and just as delicious.

  2. Ha . . . I also have baking projects on my agenda tomorrow night in an effort to rid my apartment of leftover flour and the like. And my dinners are, with each passing night, becoming a stranger amalgamation of produce!

    This posole does resemble the type we had in Santa Fe; it’s more soupy than your last attempt.

  3. i love learning new foods!!

  4. Pingback: Easy Weeknight Chicken Posole Recipe for Chilly Fall Nights | Every Day Southwest

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  6. Ha . . . I also have binakg projects on my agenda tomorrow night in an effort to rid my apartment of leftover flour and the like. And my dinners are, with each passing night, becoming a stranger amalgamation of produce!This posole does resemble the type we had in Santa Fe; it’s more soupy than your last attempt.

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